listserv message detail


 

Rohrbaugh, Mark (NIH/OD) [E] | Jun, 29 2017

 

Vaccine development

Is anyone aware of literature or papers describing the role of government/universities in the development and private sector commercialization of vaccines?   And the scientific, regulatory and commercial risks associated with that effort?
 
Thanks,
Mark
 
Mark L. Rohrbaugh, Ph.D., J.D.
Special Advisor for Technology Transfer
Director, Division of Technology Transfer and Innovation Policy
Office of Science Policy
Office of the Director
National Institutes of Health
 

Deborah Stine | Jun, 29 2017

 

Re: Vaccine development

 

View Original Post

Not sure if this is what you’re looking for, but two Obama PCAST reports focused on vaccines.  See the general website as it has more info than just the report including press releases, blogs, etc., and then
click on reports.
 
https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/eop/ostp/pcast

2009-- H1N1 (my first as Exec Dir of PCAST, so I remember it well!), which also has a follow-up analysis on actions that were taken as a result of the report.  Although this and the 2010 report focused on
influenza, many of the issues addressed are relevant regardless of vaccine.
 
2010 – influenza vaccine report
 
2012 – propelling innovation report
 
2014 – systems engineering report (less relevant, but interesting)
 
Debbie
 

Deborah D. Stine, PhD

Professor of the Practice, Engineering and Public Policy Department 

Associate Director for Policy Outreach, Scott Institute for Energy Innovation

 

Carnegie Mellon University
Scott Hall 5119 (office)

Scott Hall 5th Floor (mail)

5000 Forbes Avenue

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-4640

 

Email: dstine@andrew.cmu.edu

Phone: 412-268-4640

Fax: 412-268-3757 

 

Personal Webpage: http://www.cmu.edu/epp/people/faculty/deborah-stine.html

Scott Institute for Energy Innovation: http://www.cmu.edu/energy/

Scott Institute Newsletter signup: http://tinyurl.com/scottnews

Scott Institute Energy Bite Radio Program:

http://energybite.org

Scott Institute Funding Newsletter Signup (for CMU use only): http://tinyurl.com/ScottFundingNews

EPP: http://www.cmu.edu/epp/

EPP Newsletter signup: http://tinyurl.com/rEPPort
 

From: Science of Science Policy Listserv <SCISIP@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV> on behalf of "Rohrbaugh, Mark (NIH/OD) [E]" <RohrBauM@OD.NIH.GOV>
Reply-To: "Rohrbaugh, Mark (NIH/OD) [E]" <RohrBauM@OD.NIH.GOV>
Date: Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 2:44 PM
To: Science of Science Policy Listserv <SCISIP@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV>
Subject: [scisip] Vaccine development

 

Is anyone aware of literature or papers describing the role of government/universities in the development and private sector commercialization of vaccines?   And the scientific, regulatory and commercial risks associated with that effort?
 
Thanks,
Mark
 
Mark L. Rohrbaugh, Ph.D., J.D.
Special Advisor for Technology Transfer
Director, Division of Technology Transfer and Innovation Policy
Office of Science Policy
Office of the Director
National Institutes of Health
 

Holly Falk-Krzesinski | Jun, 29 2017

 

Re: Vaccine development

 

View Original Post

Here’re a few references you might start with:
 
·      
Stevens, A.J., Jensen, J.J., Wyller, K., Kilgore, P.C., London, E., Zhang, Q., Chatterjee, S.K., Rohrbaugh, M.L. The commercialization of new drugs and vaccines discovered
in public sector research (2015) University Technology Transfer: The Globalization of Academic Innovation (book chapter), pp. 102-145. DOI: 10.4324/9781315882482
·      
Halliday, J. Commercial Aspects of Vaccine Development (2016) Micro- and Nanotechnology in Vaccine Development (book chapter), pp. 411-421. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-323-39981-4.00022-1

·      
Stephens, P. Vaccine R&D: Past performance is no guide to the future (2014) Vaccine, 32 (19), pp. 2139-2142. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.02.047
·
Regards,
Holly

 

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” – Mary Oliver
                                                                                                                                                                                    
Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD
Vice President, Global Strategic Networks
Co-chair, Gender Working Group
Elsevier
 

 
453 Cedar Court South
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 USA
Mobile +1 847-848-2953
Email
h.falk-krzesinski@elsevier.com

Executive Assistant Lisa Gill |
lisa.gill@elsevier.com | +1 212-633-3933
LinkedIn
http://www.linkedin.com/in/hollyfk 

Twitter @hfalk14
ORCID 0000-0001-8112-2445
 
Elsevier Research Intelligence
www.elsevier.com/research-intelligence
 
Adjunct Senior Instructor, School of Professional Studies
Philanthropy and Nonprofit Organizations | Northwestern University
 
Founding President | National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP)

 

Stephen Fiore | Jun, 29 2017

 

Re: Vaccine development

 

View Original Post

In light of the question on vaccines and the subsequent citations, I wanted to recommend a report, written by Seth Shulman, back in 2002.  It’s called “Trouble on the Endless Frontier:  Science, Invention and the Erosion of the
Technological Commons.”  It later evolved into this book “Owning the Future” (see https://www.amazon.com/Owning-Future-Staking-Knowledge-Frontier/dp/03958...).  Anyway, in the introduction, Shulman makes a powerful point about the changing ecosystem of ideas,
ownership, and patents.  This is likely old news to many in the policy innovation community, but it was quite illuminating to me when I started paying attention to these topics in the early 2000s.  The relevant quote is below.

 

Best,

Steve

 

 

“For a number of reasons, the landscape of scientific research has changed significantly over the past few decades as industrialized nations shift toward a knowledge-based economy. From U.S. Supreme Court rulings to international trade negotiations, the United
States has led the rest of the world in moving swiftly to institutionalize the notion of knowledge as a commodity. Many of the key decisions that furthered this institutionalization have come about with little public debate and with remarkably little foresight
about their potential long-term consequences.  
An oft-cited example from a previous, revered generation of scientists illustrates the virtual sea change that has occurred in our notions about ownership and proprietary claims in high-tech research. In 1954, when Jonas Salk developed a polio vaccine, he never
for a moment considered the idea of pursuing individual ownership rights to the discovery. Nor did Salk imagine the idea of licensing the vaccine in an effort to personally control the direction of future research in the field. In fact, Salk’s funder, the
March of Dimes, prohibited patenting or the receipt of royalties on the results of its research projects.
When Edward R. Murrow, the renowned television commentator of the day, asked, “Who will control the new pharmaceutical?” Salk replied that, naturally, the discovery belonged to the public. “There is no
patent,” he said. “Could you patent the sun?”  This story bears repeating for the contrast it offers to the contemporary research environment. In the 1990s, for example, a biochemist named Donald Young and his team at the University of Rochester conducted
pioneering work to help understand the Cox-2 enzyme. Unlike Salk, however, this team sought—and, in April 2000 won—a patent on their research. The result: a bitter, ongoing, multi-million dollar lawsuit involving Young, the University of Rochester, and two
pharmaceutical companies that have brought to market a new class of painkillers—the Cox-2 inhibitors—that block the action of this enzyme. Officials at the University of Rochester contend that Young’s seminal research should entitle them to billions of dollars
in royalties on any drugs relating to the Cox-2 enzyme that result during the patent’s 17-year term. When Gerald P. Dodson, a lawyer representing the University of Rochester, was interviewed by the press, he said the university was thrilled with the situation.
“Imagine waking up in the morning and having a patent on aspirin,” Dodson said. “Well, these people at Rochester woke up this morning and have a patent on a substitute for aspirin that is even better" (Shulman, 2002, pp. 5-6).

 

https://www.newamerica.org/oti/policy-papers/trouble-on-the-endless-fron...

--------

Stephen M. Fiore, Ph.D.

Professor, Cognitive Sciences, Department of Philosophy (philosophy.cah.ucf.edu/staff.php?id=134)

Director, Cognitive Sciences Laboratory, Institute for Simulation & Training (http://csl.ist.ucf.edu/)

University of Central Florida

sfiore@ist.ucf.edu