listserv messages

Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/18/2017 - 11:35
Fascinating.   One quick look – family expenditures – health is the highest, by quite a bit.    Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by C. Scott Dempwolf on 04/24/2017 - 07:51
I use USASpending.gov.  A little unwieldy but comprehensive and updated regularly - most agencies within 30 days;  DOD within 90 days.  It contains all federal contracts and major subcontracts and you can filter for research contracts.  For me it is a good supplement to NIH, NSF, and SBIR; and captures research spending by other agencies.Scott [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/25/2017 - 09:33
Thanks Scott, How/where do you filter for research contracts? I do not see it. David At 11:51 AM 4/24/2017, you wrote: I useUSASpending.gov.  A little unwieldy but comprehensive and updated regularly - most agencies within 30 days;  DOD within 90 days.  It contains all federal contracts and major subcontracts and you can filter for research contracts.  For me it is a good supplement to NIH, NSF, and SBIR; and captures research spending by other agencies. Scott On Tue, Apr... [Read more]  
Replied by Caroline Wagner on 04/25/2017 - 13:56
Just to be clear – these are NOT NEW sources of data. These data have been around for years, and have been Congressionally mandated to be shared since at least the 1990s. Caroline Wagner     [Read more]  
Replied by Jeffrey Alexander on 04/25/2017 - 10:29
I'll add that the USASpending.gov data on contracts is drawn from the Federal Procurement Data System, which is notoriously error-prone (although it has improved in recent years). In particular, the classifications of contracts are often faulty, especially in that contracts that are not research-related get classified as research contracts due to insufficient attention during data entry.If you're not looking at these datasets at a granular level, but more for general trends, they are quite sufficient.-jeff [Read more]  
Replied by Gary Anderson on 04/26/2017 - 15:07
I wanted to second Jeff’s note of caution regarding FPDS data. A while back we had a contractor take a look at FY11 FPDS data and we are currently taking a deep dive into FY14, FY15 and FY16 data. Contracting officers enter detailed data on each contract action into the FPDS system. For the four years that we have looked at there are approximately 350,000 contract actions in the FPDS data. For each action, contract officers choose a product or service code which specifies the stage and area of research and development obligation, a description of contract requirement,... [Read more]  
Replied by C. Scott Dempwolf on 04/26/2017 - 11:49
All good points Gary and Jeff.  Glad NSF is looking at this from a data quality perspective.  I use the data to augment network and 'event-sequence' models of innovation ecosystems, and I add it after the core networks have been constructed from patent, NIH, NSF, SBIR and other data sources.  The models are resilient to modest levels of potential mis-codings you described.On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 3:07 PM, Anderson, Gary W <ganderso@nsf.gov> wrote: I wanted to second Jeff’s note of caution regarding FPDS data. A while... [Read more]  

Posted by Holly Falk-Krzesinski on 04/17/2017 - 09:32
Colleagues:   I’m trying to understand the breadth of external reporting universities do and am cataloging the various external reporting instruments/surveys universities complete (mandatory or optional) wrt to student or faculty activity and/or research activity.  Can you recommend any others I should add to the list below (I’ll share the compiled list back with the listserv)?   Thank you, Holly   ·      CGS/GRE Graduate Enrollment & Degrees Survey ·       NSF Survey of Graduate Students... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/17/2017 - 08:16
Holly – this is amazing – am I right in guessing that many of these reports require the same or in some cases overlapping bits of information?   Is collection and reporting standardized? S Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by Holly Falk-Krzesinski on 04/17/2017 - 13:23
To answer your questions, Susan:   many of these reports require the same or in some cases overlapping bits of information Probably…   Is collection and reporting standardized Not likely…       Also, I should clarify my request: my focus is on US universities.  However, I certainly welcome info and insight about reporting in other countries as well.   Regards, Holly     --   From: Susan Fitzpatrick [mailto:susan@jsmf.org] Sent:... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/17/2017 - 09:52
All federal information collections (including NSF and ED) have to be cleared through the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in OMB. (I helped set OIRA up 2.3 eons ago). This includes a burden estimate. If there is duplication or undue burden then one might complain to OIRA. See https://www.reginfo.gov/public/jsp/Utilities/faq.jsp#icr_info I will be happy to advise, as best I can. David David Wojick, Ph.D.... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/17/2017 - 09:14
My questions were more of the general curiosity and not just about burden (although that is an issue I am sure) – I was just concerned that so often there seems to be lots of different forms of data collected to fulfill specific purposes that could serve more general purposes.   And – because data is collected for specific purposes and in specific ways across a number of different aggregators we often get knowledge resembling swiss cheese rather than whole cloth (if I can miX my metaphors…).    Thanks, S  Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/17/2017 - 10:51
What sort of general purposes do you have in mind? The specific federal agency collections are dictated by agency mission and need. These general purposes may not be a government function. On the other hand interagency cooperation might be feasible, or a legislative mandate. But burden plays in here because burden (labor hours to compile and provide the information) is the cost in the cost-benefit analysis of the proposed collection. Every agency has a burden budget which constrains their information collection activities. The collective... [Read more]  
Replied by Hale, Katherine L. on 04/17/2017 - 15:12
Holly,   The National Survey of Recent College Graduates (NSRCG) no longer occurs. It surveyed individuals, not universities.   You could add to your list the Survey of Science and Engineering Research Facilities,https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/srvyfacilities/#sd   Katherine Hale Senior Science Resources Analyst Science and Engineering Indicators Program National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics National Science Foundation 703-292-7786... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/17/2017 - 10:24
Knowledge could be one general purpose.   But by the tone of your email I feel we are communicating at cross purposes.   My ideal would be to strive for less burden – better knowledge.    I wasn’t expecting a question about how much duplication of effort reporting requires would subject me to a lecture.   And if I wanted to be provocative I would suggest that people’s time is highly taxed already without much worry about it.   Thank you for your responses.   On my end, the subject is closed. Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/17/2017 - 12:18
Sorry, I was just trying to explain how the government actually operates in this context. If that is not a consideration then my point was pointless.David [Read more]  
Replied by Christopher Hill on 04/17/2017 - 15:43
While noting and managing the burden of Federal agency data collection from universities, it is important to keep in mind that these same data are extremely valuable to the reporting institutions, both internally and as they position themselves in the highly competitive higher education marketplace. How often have we heard, "I wish the [fill in the blank agency] had more and more detailed data on [fill in the blank.]  I just don't want them to ask me to provide that data for my institution"?... [Read more]  
I have a bias here as our nonprofit was founded primarily to address the researcher burden of duplicative 'admin data' collection.When the is a high overlap in the admin data being collected we believe there is an opportunity for the collecting agencies to assess the level of commonality and harmonization potential and codify that agreement into a standard that research institutions can build into their local admin data software (where possible). This way, rather than multiple overlapping surveys and data-entry anew each time - institutions could generate annual 'mini-reports' that... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/18/2017 - 04:34
Sounds great, D. You should be talking to OIRA, since they make federal information collection policy, right down to individual collections, and they have the power to enforce it. The National Science and Technology Council, which consists of all the science agencies, also has a new Interagency Working Group on Open Science (IWGOS) that might be interested. Davidinside Public Access [Read more]  

Pages